Tag Archives: smart policing

Policing in the 21st Century and Smarter Crime Control: What shifts policy to cost effective public safety?

Compared to 50 years ago, health policy has led to much longer life expectancy. Technology has led to a much easier life. But criminal justice policy has only recently been associated with rates of street crime close to those in the 1960´s when the USA had 3 Presidential Commissions on violence. We are also now more aware that intimate partner and sexual violence is much more rampant than debated 50 years ago.

Recent innovations in Canada and evidence based initiatives in the USA suggest that a shift in policy could reduce interpersonal violent crime by 50% or more combined with huge savings in tax expenditures. So what do we know about how to make this shift? To what extent will these innovations and initiatives lead to application of the evidence and so less interpersonal violent crime and greater public safety at less cost? Will they achieve the potential for a 50% reduction in street crime and intimate partner and sexual violence? Will they reduce taxes on crime and justice by $6 billion in Canada and $75 billion in the USA?

The CCA Panel on the Future of Policing Canada in the 21st century emphasized that policing is just one player in reducing interpersonal violence and providing public safety. The book on Smarter Crime Control reviewed the accumulated evidence on cost effective public safety to show that (i) specific policing strategies that are pro-active and in partnerships to be effective and (ii) that many pre-crime prevention investments are proven to be more cost effective in preventing much of violent crime.

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Smarter Crime Control – An Agenda for Action – for 2014!

My new book on Smarter Crime Control uses the evidence on what are effective ways to reduce violent crime to propose an agenda for action to cut violence by 50% and save taxpayers billions – in the USA $100 billion a year.

Current rates of murder, traffic fatalities, drug overdoses, and incarceration are unacceptable in 2014. We have the knowledge and best practices to make them history and reduce the waste of taxes on what has not worked. The book organizes the knowledge to show how to retool policing, improve corrections, and make criminal courts more preventive. It confirms ways to help youth in problem neighborhoods start on a path that does not lead to chronic offending, gang violence, and incarceration. It proposes promising ways to stop violence against women and fatalities on the roads. It shows how cities can take charge of making their neighborhoods safer for less. It is written as A guide to a safer future for citizens, communities, and politicians.

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Does Canada have its own new Jim Crow?

Does Canada have its own new Jim Crow? Is Canada making the same mistakes as the USA? Are racial minorities disproportionately victims of violence due to over-reliance on incarceration?

Canada was forced to focus recently on fact not political fiction. Canada not only over-incarcerates its minorities but is allowing rapid growth in incarceration of Aboriginal Peoples and visible minorities. Unfortunately these policies are not reducing violence, particularly for Aboriginal Peoples and ¨visible minorities¨. Let´s get strategies that champion victims by stopping violence. Let´s stop taxes going to pick up pieces. Let’s get smarter crime control in Canada.

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The Future of Crime Prevention: Solutions to Challenges by Erich Marks (post 36)

One of Europe´s foremost experts on crime prevention identified seven challenges to the future of crime prevention for the European Forum on Urban Safety´s Congress on the Future of Crime Prevention.

He calls for governments to invest in applying our current prevention knowledge and shift from over-use of more of the same and ¨crime fighting¨. Responsible persons will use evidence based strategies and in doubt adapt programs proven to have worked in the past. The cost benefit analyses show that crime prevention is more successful than more of the same when there is good management of the prevention programs and adequate funding and personnel.

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Politicians can invest now in violence prevention – public interest demands it – no more excuses (post 35)

Smart politicians must invest now in proven violence prevention. It is more cost effective than reactive policing and more jails. So the public interest calls for investment in what works to reduce violence, smarter use of current police resources and a shift to prevention from taxes wasted on over-use of jails.

For this investment to remain fiscally neutral, politicians must simultaneously limit the growth of incarceration. We know that a dollar of taxpayers money invested in early childhood or youth prevention will have the same impact on crime as $7 on the operation of prisons.

Politicians can no longer prop-up their inaction on proven violence prevention. It is easy to access the knowledge. It is affordable. Inaction is costing gains in immediate opportunities for at risk youth and long term pain to victims and misspent taxes.

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